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Newsroom - October

Many Still Struggle To Get Insurers To Pay For Mental Health Treatment

WBUR, Here & Now segment, October 30, 2018
In 2008, Congress implemented a federal law requiring insurance companies to cover mental illness on par with other medical issues. Despite this legislation, many people still have to go to great lengths to get their mental health treatments paid for. Read more »

Study: Opioid Crisis In Mass. May Be More Far-Reaching Than Originally Believed

WBUR, October 26, 2018
A new study by researchers at Boston Medical Center finds that the opioid crisis may be hitting far more people in Massachusetts than previously estimated. Read more »

In Mass., Federal Opioid Funds Target Those Recovering From Addiction

WBUR, October 22, 2018
Stipends to attend job training programs and subsidies for cellphones, subway cards and work clothes. These are some of the things Massachusetts has invested in using federal money to combat the nationwide opioid epidemic. Read more »

For many, a struggle to find affordable mental health care

Boston Globe, October 20, 2018
Massachusetts has more mental health care providers per capita than any other state, more psychiatrists than anywhere but Washington, D.C., more child psychiatrists than all but D.C. and Rhode Island. Yet poor and middle-class patients describe an often-frustrating and painful struggle to find a provider who will see them, at a price they can afford. They sometimes suffer longer than necessary, or settle for care by an inexperienced or less-credentialed practitioner. Read more »

New Guidelines Expand HPV Vaccines For 27- To 45-Year-Olds

WBUR, October 10, 2018
The vaccine that prevents the human papillomavirus, HPV, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for men and women 27 to 45 years old. It was previously approved for use in children and young adults between 9 and 26. HPV causes cervical and vaginal cancers in women, as well as cancers of the penis, neck and throat in men. Studies have shown the vaccine to be nearly 90 percent effective in preventing cancers and precancerous lesions. Read more »